Monthly Archives: November 2020

The Best Decision

By Jack Talley

Upon coming to UJ, I had no idea what to expect.

I knew one other guy and the basketball coach. After a few weeks, I was able to make a few friends from classes and as well as from being involved as much as I could around campus. I realized that UJ was the place for me.

Coming from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, a city a bit bigger than Jamestown, I did not know how I would adjust to the “small town” feel. As time passed, I grew to love it.

Before coming here, my vision of college was always a large university with all the people I went to high school with—much different than how it was here. But I would never change that. I think that coming to UJ has helped me focus on my studies and become the best student I can be. My professors have always been willing to talk to me about my classes and provide me with the extra help I’ve needed to make sure I was successful. This support helped me realize that school is very important and made the classes much easier for me to enjoy.

Playing basketball here is something I would not trade for anything. Like I said, not having any connections at first made me nervous. Playing basketball put me into the Jimmie family more than anything ever could. With basketball, I have made the best friends that I have ever had in my life—people that I know I can count on to be there for me. With basketball, it is like a brotherhood, and being able to compete with your best friends is the coolest thing I can imagine.

If I had to pick my favorite thing about UJ, it would be the community that is the Jimmie family. As a Jimmie, you know that there are a ton of people that are out there supporting you and wishing you the best. Getting to know all the students, and even working on campus over the summer, has given me memories that I will never forget.

To wrap it up, I think that coming to the University of Jamestown is the best decision that I have ever made. GO JIMMIES!

Hold Fast. Stay True.

By Nate Holmes

If I had to title the chapter of my life that began at UJ, I would title it “Hold Fast, Stay True”.

I come from a rough, humbling neighborhood in Miami, Florida. My vision of the world was very narrow before my time here at UJ. My desire for more, paired with what I believe to be an opportunity from God, is honestly what prompted me to come all the way out to North Dakota.

Prior to coming here, I had never envisioned myself way in North Dakota, let alone playing football here. I had never even seen snow before now. I came here with expectations that have been tested since my first steps on campus.

I had this notion that God had finally set me up to win easily. I was sadly mistaken.

I got here, and the world as I knew it immediately flipped upside down. My faith and trust in God were tested like never before. I couldn’t believe the things I was experiencing. Football was just something I’d never been a part of, my grades were at an all-time low, and I missed my family like crazy.

The bible speaks a lot about long suffering.

We forget that suffering is a part of this life, but you have to get through it. I found true mentorship here with Coach Mistro, Coach Ryder and Chaplin Candace. Those three have been my rock and my brothers, like Cedric Terry has been my family. They taught me to hold fast to the process and stay true to my assignment.

My campus ministry team has also been a light in my life, and I am forever grateful for them. UJ has afforded me the opportunity to meet people who truly care for the well-being of the next man. I found my extended family here. I am forever indebted to UJ for it.

Years to Come

By Allison Galbreath

During Freshman Convocation, former UJ President, Dr. Badal, told us that we will often hear to cherish our college years, because they are meant to be our best years—but that we should look forward to the future because our best years will often come later in life.

While I hope to have many amazing years to come, I can say without a doubt that my years at the University of Jamestown have been the best so far.

Why UJ?

I chose UJ for many reasons, one of them being the fact that UJ let me explore all of the things I was interested in. In many larger schools, I would be forced to choose between academics, theater, volunteering, and campus ministry, but UJ gave me the opportunity to participate in all of the things I am passionate about and find an inner peace as all of my passions came together. This peace allowed me to not only learn more about myself, but accept God’s call into pastoral ministry.

Finding my place

Like most freshmen, I started university with no idea where I was meant to be heading, but during my freshman year, I was able to find clarity and find a group of people who would support and encourage me in my ministry. I also made some amazing friends who have helped me grow and laugh and love every moment. Theater especially has given me the chance to grow and come out of my shell to be a more confident and open person.

This isn’t to say things were never difficult; finding who you are is often a difficult thing. During those times, though, I was able to turn to my mentors, friends, and God for guidance. What I can say with confidence now is that I am a Child of God and I am a UJ Jimmie.

Always have hope

I’d like to leave you with my favorite piece of scripture—a verse that continually inspires me—Psalm 71:14, “As for me, I will always have hope. And I will praise the Lord more and more”. As for me, I have hope in tomorrow. I have hope that there are many more amazing years to come and that we can overcome anything as a community.

“Tabla: Indian Culture through Drumming: A Review”

By Andrew Reed

I attended the “Tabla: Indian Culture through Drumming” event on Wednesday October 28th to follow up my last article “Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum” and it did not disappoint.

I was greeted by Dr. Kihle at the doors of Voorhees Chapel on campus to a crowd of 6 or 7 students and a dozen more on Zoom. Dr. Kihle, being a percussion expert himself, had brought along with him plenty of different kinds of drums and even his own Tabla for students to try.

Dishant Thakkar, the keynote speaker, was projected on the large screen at the head of the chapel playing his own Tabla for all of us to hear for a couple of minutes before the actual event would begin. Thakkar was wonderful and it was amazing to see how many different sounds he could make with just two drums, which he would also explain how to do later.

Thakkar began the event by explaining who he was and the journey of his life that brought him to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he currently resides. We (the audience) then followed a presentation that Thakkar made on Indian culture, diversity, misconceptions and influence on the rest of the world. “It was cool to hear all this new information from somebody who has lived in both cultures (U.S. and Indian).”, said Benjamin Weaver, an attendee of the event, “I really enjoyed it.”

Thakkar finished his presentation with explaining the history, genres and parts of the Tabla drums. Then, the audience got a hands-on beginner’s lesson on how to play the Tabla drums. Thakkar walked the audience through a beginner song called Teen Taal which is meant for learning how to keep a rhythm on the drums.

Overall, I would call this event a success for the Look Beyond Committee with around 20 people in attendance on Zoom and in-person who experienced “Tabla: Indian Culture through Drumming.” I want to thank Dr. Kihle for letting me sit in and experience this event myself and I look forward to the next event put on by this Committee.